This brand should be called Starbucks’ “dirty little secret”. Although Starbucks prides itself on ensuring ethical and environmentally friendly practices are used in their coffee production and even offers organic varieties, their Seattle’s Best brand doesn’t hold to the same standards. It is basically Starbucks way of competing with cheap brands like Folgers and Maxwell House. They do offer a couple organic varieties.

A talented roaster first, but also on top of their café game (their in-house baker does some very good work), look for one of three beautiful shops scattered around South Dakota's largest city to sustain you through those long, Upper Great Plains winters. Fun fact—head roaster Andrew Fritz started out as a curious customer, slowly working his way up through the ranks at this relatively underrated operation.
The top-rated Reunion Island Sidama (94) is Fair Trade as well as organic-certified. Anne Wiseman, marketing coordinator for Reunion Island, says that it’s important for the company to offer organic-certified coffees, and that their organic selection is growing with consumer demand. Reunion Island has committed to carry this same organically-certified Sidama, from the same importer and producers, on an ongoing basis.

After roughly thirty years of experience in the business—this is a guy who roasted something like 70 million pounds of coffee for Peet's, which is a lot—Paul Gallegos is back home and in business for himself with this much-anticipated roaster/café in Albuquerque's atmospheric Old Town. Expect this to be a complete game changer in a town that's been waiting for someone to take things to the next level for quite some time now.


Ingredients: The main ingredient in organic coffee is coffee beans. But most brands come with additional ingredients to produce a wonderful taste, and aroma. Some of the additional ingredients include chocolate and Ganoderma lucidum. These ingredients help to deliver different flavors and aroma. You should be keen to choose a brand that will suit your flavor needs.
As one of the few products we have reviewed, that comes in hermetically sealed pressurized cans; this brand deserves some applause. The package results in an intensely fresh coffee powder. And illy is an excellent option if you want the authentic Italian taste. Their products are certified ethical by DNV. The coffee blend contains 100% pure Arabica beans sourced from growers across the world.
Also try For the best Ohio morning ever, in any weather, stop at Heartwood Coffee Roastery in Cleveland-adjacent Hudson, then disappear onto the trails of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, next door. As if you needed more proof that incredible coffee can happen anywhere, nowadays, Branch Street Coffee Roasters, in a strip mall outside of hardscrabble Youngstown, offers more. Down in Columbus, seek out the sleek, twin locations of Fox in the Snow, while in Cincinnati, Ferrari Bros. Barber & Coffee is a vintage family business, now being nudged (ever so sensitively) into the present day.
Next on our list is Jungle Costa Rican Coffee. This brand of coffee blend is made from pure Arabica beans. It is made and distributed by its namesake company, which is located in Doral, Florida. The beans are mainly sourced from local growers in Costa Rica. The beans are grown in fertile volcanic soil which gives the beans a light and mild acidic taste. Each batch of beans are roasted in the right temperature and in the right amount of time and are packed in heat-sealed high barrier stand-up foil bags.
Newman’s Own is a feel-good coffee—it’s organic, all company profits go to charity, and Paul Newman’s little dad-hot cartoon face on the bag grins approvingly at your choices. Its flavor is uncomplicated, and it tastes like the last coffee of the day should taste—a 3 p.m. pick-me-up that tows you calmly to the end of the workday rather than punching you in the eye-bags like a morning coffee needs to. This is the most expensive in the bunch, at $16.46 per pound, and isn’t so far ahead of Green Mountain ($13.32/lb) that it’s worth the splurge on anything but ethical or aesthetic grounds. Moreover, it falls short of Green Mountain in thermal shift and microwaveability: flavor deteriorates in proportion with temperature, and after microwaving dries out the inside of one’s mouth—not a problem if you’re a quick drinker, but sippers beware.
First, I don't know jack about coffee, so take this for what it's worth. I thought this was decent coffee and it is organic which is a plus, but it is too finely ground for my use, goes right through a metal strainer and will require a paper filter. The taste is definitely a medium roast which I am perfectly happy with, and it is better than the free stuff I get at work.
As you’ve already guessed, this organic decaf coffee was made for Keurig Single Cup Brewers. Therefore, you need to own one prior to buying this coffee. Once you do, you will be able to enjoy this amazingly bold, refined, and smooth dark brew that will sooth your heart and your senses. The blend is a medium and dark roast, and the coffee itself has been decaffeinated by the water process.

What is interesting about this blend is the fact that it uses premium coffee beans from all the major regions in the world. So you will get a bit of American, African and Asian flavors in this blend. And they have also managed to harmonize and balance all the flavors well, resulting in a rich and dark roast. We like the fact that Peet’s provides the roast date on the package.
Furthermore, the cultivators who grow this coffee take a good care of the yield. In addition to that, the company has earned the Fairtrade as well as the Organic certification. In fact, the company had maintained deep relations with the coffee cultivating groups from Ethiopia native. These groups are popular for cultivating quality and consistent coffee beans.
Gevaliamay have the prettiest packaging of all the assembled coffees, with a distinctive yellow bag and stylized illustrations fit for an IKEA. Despite its apparent fanciness, Gevalia is widely available in pharmacies and grocery stores, and usually for fairly cheap. A 12-ounce. bag of House Blend was $6.99 at Stop & Shop, making it the cheapest of the non-canned coffees I tested. Perhaps consequently, heat is an essential component to an enjoyable cup of Gevalia, and the taste becomes flat and headachy as it cools. However, Gevalia is the rare coffee that performs well in a microwave, and tastes as good reheated as it does freshly brewed. 
You won’t find local Robusta coffee in the United States. This coffee variety is exclusively grown in the Eastern Hemisphere, primarily in Africa. While some countries are able to grow both arabica and Robusta coffee, the climate needed is very specific and curated for Robusta coffee. If you like strong, rich coffee with nothing but coffee flavor and caffeine for days, you’re looking for Robusta.
Gregg Parker is a writer and puppy enthusiast who divides his time between Los Angeles and the rest of the world. A graduate of the University of Southern California, his eclectic career has involved positions in education, health care, entertainment, nonprofit fundraising, technology, and literature. A points and miles expert, he's well-versed in all topics related to travel, including luggage and travel accessories. Other areas of expertise include pet care products, teaching resources, kitchen appliances, and anything related to coffee or barbecue.

Organic coffees are produced without the use of chemicals including fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides. These coffees are healthy and let you enjoy full-bodied flavors and tastes. While some organic coffees are instant, others require the use of coffee makers. Instant organic coffees are perfect for busy mornings or when you want to skip the brewing process.
Back in the day, preparing coffee is a time-consuming and complicated task. Today, it has become a lot easier, especially with the introduction of innovative coffeemakers, including the one from Keurig. With the latter, you can use revolutionary K-cups to prepare your coffee quickly and without guesswork, guaranteeing consistent and delicious taste.
On the other side of the caffeinated spectrum, the Canadian brand, Kicking Horse Coffee has been creating organic, Fair Trade coffee for several decades now. Proud of their place of business, they roast these premium beans to perfection, three-thousand feet above sea level, near the headwaters of the mighty Columbia River. Whether it’s the fresh air of the Rocky Mountains or the altitude, something about their process delivers incredible flavors.
Another great choice for anyone looking to experiment with coffee from different roasters, MistoBox offers a highly personalized subscription. When you sign up, you’ll be asked about your personal coffee preferences. Based on your answers, MistoBox will select a variety of coffee for you to try and send it to your door. How often you get new coffee is completely up to you, as you can customize every part of your subscription experience with them.

Coffee can be compared to wine in terms of flavor because it is also affected by soil, altitude and the region in which it’s grown. The two types of coffee bean options are Arabica and Robusta, but what does this mean? The easiest way to categorize the two is by the altitude in which they grew. Arabica beans are grown in the mountains at an altitude above 2000 feet, while Robusta coffee is found below that, typically on flat plantations.


This coffee, as I have stated above is delicious. The problem is, that out of the 18 cups, only two didnt fail. The Keurig would start to brew and be about half done, then the foil top of the cup would simply detach from cup in a spot, and the grounds would come spilling out. Almost as if whatever adhesive was used melted. Never had a problem with other cups. So, perhaps this was simply this batch of the product, but a co-worker had expressed a similar issue with Newman's Own cups months prior, but I had just figured that THAT was a bad batch of cups....
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