The same holds true for Kickapoo Coffee, whose Ethiopia Kirite also scored 93. Caleb Nicholas says, “About 97 percent of the coffee we roast is certified organic, and we would not have purchased the Kirite if it were conventional. The USDA seal is optional, and we designed the bags to accommodate both organic and non-organic. If we put the seal on it, it would be just another sticker. Instead, we just label the coffee as organic and list our certifier, MOSA.”
Who would have guessed that one of the most impressive coffee roasters in the West would have come up in the land of hot drinks abstainers? No doubt the pioneering team behind this single estate-only operation were slightly surprised, too—at a time when Salt Lake had very little good coffee to speak of, they took the plunge; now it's hard to imagine Utah's impressive artisan scene without them.
The coffee is great and the staff is lovely. Would definitely recommend trying oat milk in any of their drinks - especially the iced latte. I'm bummed they no longer serve their spring roles because those were a great grab-and-go option. They do have an ample assortment of pastries, though! If you're there in the morning there's always a selection of cookies, scones, muffins etc.
The soul of this coffee is in the high-altitude region of Latin America, which is the one responsible for making the coffee naturally bright and sweet. To be specific, the beans are sourced all the way from Colombia and Guatemala. The premium beans that are used in the production of the coffee provides a medium and smooth body with notes of sweet citrus and chocolate. The company is also known for its programs that help its local farmers as a way of giving back to the community.
As a mildly employed freelance writer, I have little disposable income, a lot of time on my hands, and strictly rationed vices. One such vice is coffee, which I drink more of than most people I know—even other freelance writers. But, despite my quantity-over-quality brewing habits, I’m capable of mustering some taste, and of standing by preference with reasoned conviction. So, with limited resources for fanciness and a desperate addiction in mind, I set out to determine which basic, widely available coffee brand should stand out from the rest on the grocery store shelf. I enjoy a Blue Bottle pour-over as much as the next fiend, but a $3 morning coffee is above my pay grade. I drink most of my coffee at home, from a bag of grounds that costs around $8, reupped on a bi-weekly grocery run. My choice of bag is usually determined by habit, or price, or shelf height, with less care than I take choosing a bar of soap, though I use both daily. When it comes to choosing a regular coffee—travel-mug, after-dinner, Sunday-morning coffee—which is best?
This is my favorite coffee! It's better than coffee I get at local coffee shops that sells for 20 dollars a pound. It's not too strong or too weak. I like to add milk, but this coffee is good black as well. I've tried a couple other Equal Exchange flavors, and I've enjoyed all of them, but Love Buzz is the one I keep returning to. I had originally tried it at a food co-op, and I just got a small amount to try, but as soon as I finished it I had to buy a whole bag of it. It's great that it's also fair traded, meaning people are paid fairly for the work that went into making this coffee.
I bought this because they replaced the office coffee-maker with a Keurig machine and it was every employee for himself! I do like the kick that this medium roast blend gives, but the flavor is lacking. The machine brews the coarsely-ground coffee so quickly, that it's not a particularly bold cup. My big issue is that with these products, the cost of the coffee is several times that of buying the beans and grinding them (or having them ground), even at a Starbucks, and the packaging is ridiculous. The amount of non-recycled waste that my usual 3-4 cups/day creates weighs on my conscience. At work, I have gone back to drinking tea.
In terms of flavor, arabica beans win the prize. They brew a more delicate cup of coffee with slight overtones of berry and a high level of acidity. Robustas have a lot more caffeine – nearly twice as much as arabica beans – but they also have a stronger, more bitter taste that can be a bit harsh. Still, there are high-quality robustas available, and these beans do make a good cup of espresso.
Belfast native Michael McCrory met Lauren Crabbe behind an espresso machine in San Diego, her hometown. A move up north for school brought the pair to the relatively quiet Outer Sunset section of the city, to the opening of this café, to considerable success (and acclaim) on the roasting front, and then another café, just up the road. All of this good fortune aside, the cafes maintain the feeling of a treasured neighborhood hangout—that is, on days when lines aren't out the door.
K-Cups were created by Keurig to be used with their specialized Keurig machines. Shortly after the original line of Keurig machines was released, coffee makers began to release their own generic-brand K-Cups. Over time, Keurig began to lose market share to these other coffee makers. They released the Keurig 2.0 machines that were ONLY compatible with K-Cups manufactured by Keurig.
Our USDA certified 100% organic, Rainforest Blend is an artful mix of coffees from Colombia, Mexico, Guatemala, and Indonesia medium roasted to produce a smooth, yet full-bodied taste with lively citrus notes. Our low acid, 100% Arabica coffee beans are all choice selected, high altitude, shade grown, and handpicked, to ensure our coffee is the best tasting coffee to be found for your Keurig K-Cup style brewers and other single serve brewing systems.
The organic coffee co. ground brand is purely organic. This is because they offer one hundred percent certified organic coffee beans, organic flavored coffees, and organic decaf coffee. Their coffee tastes good since they directly go to the source to purchase their coffee from, and they grow their own organic coffee at their own unique farms. They always stand for the premium, fair, sustainable, and direct trade coffee at prices customers love. They also give quality organic coffee to the market.
However, one of the selection criteria for the Top 30 coffees is value or affordability, measured by price per pound. Many of the coffees on our list are priced in line with similar, though usually less distinguished, single-origin specialty coffees in the marketplace. Half (15) of the coffees on the list cost $25 or less per pound. Four were priced at $20 or less per pound, namely: No. 4 Lexington Coffee Tarime Tanzania (95 points; $14.75/12 ounces), No. 6 Barrington Coffee Twenty Five (96 points; $14.25/12 ounces), No. 23 Big Shoulders Coffee Roasters Burundi Buhorwa  (94 points; 15.00/12 ounces), and No. 28 Paradise Roasters Ecuador Pichincha Typica (94 points; 13.95/12 ounces).
I ordered the Equal Exchange Organic Ethiopian Coffee after receiving a notice (prior to my subscription shipment) that the price had gone up on the Coffee Masters Gourmet Coffee, Ethiopian Yirgacheffe, Whole Bean, 12-Ounce Bags (Pack of 4) , a coffee I discovered after a long search and many pounds of not very good coffee. The price on the equal exchange was about 15-20% lower; what i had been paying for the other when I subscribed, and had a lot of good reviews so I thought I would give it a try.
When Four Barrel veterans Tim & Elisha Griffin opted out of San Francisco, they landed in Fargo, where their small shop (handed over from a previous owner) quickly rose through the ranks in a city already mindful of the benefits of a solid cup of coffee. Right now, they're working with Heart, out of Portland, but rumor has it they'll be roasting their own soon, not to mention moving to a larger location in Fargo's happening downtown.

The Newman’s organic coffee is decaffeinated using the natural water process. Packed with the retro designed K-Cups, it provides a strong yet smooth taste with no unpleasant aftertaste. This coffee is a great solution for all of you who are searching for the perfect medium roasted decaf coffee. You will enjoy its refined yet bold aroma with no artificial additives.

Their unique business model is one of the main advantages of Equal Exchange. They are one of the most ethical and environment-friendly brands around. They source high-quality arabica beans almost exclusively from small organic farmers who practice sustainable farming methods. As for the coffee, it is a smooth blend of medium and dark roasts. The final effect is a very mellow, not too strong or harsh coffee with a rich feel.
This K-cup is compatible with all Keurig coffee machines. It is made using beans that have been grown in lands at high altitude. This means that the coffee is denser, and it is also more potent in terms of the antioxidants that it contains. Best of all, there is a satisfaction guarantee from the manufacturer. If you are unhappy in any way with this coffee, you can have it returned and you will be given an unconditional refund.

The important factor to consider with your coffee source is the processing procedure in the location from which it came. For example, coffee beans that are sourced from Ethiopia or Brazil are processed naturally and result in bold and fruity flavors. Africa processes their beans in a washed process that produces more well-balanced and complex flavors with noticeable acidity when roasted. On the other hand, coffee that is sourced from Central and South America tends to be more expensive due to the processing method that reduces mold on the beans.


Similar to the product that has been mentioned above, this is also a coffee that is perfect if you do not want to upset your stomach after enjoying your caffeine fix. The acid is 70% lesser compared to most of the coffee you can find on the market. There are also no additives, so you can be confident about the purity that you can enjoy in every cup. Plus, there is no pronounced bitterness, but it can provide a full flavor in every sip. Lastly, it is also rich in antioxidants, which makes the coffee good for your health.
The coffee comes well-packaged in a traditional foil-lined bag that seals in freshness. It’s easy to peel open and can nicely be folded shut and secured with clamps that are a part of the package. Great for convenience and storage. The whole beans are nicely roasted and ready to be ground. This particular 12 ounce bag lasted the two of us about 9 days- but we are avid (almost alarmingly so) coffee drinkers. For a typical household I’d assume this bag would easily last 2 to 3 weeks. We tried this coffee with a drip coffee maker, French press, and electric coffee maker. It wasn’t quite dark enough to work with the drip coffee maker and the flavor was very mild and watery when paired with that method. The French press got the best flavor from this coffee and really allowed you to taste the mild nutty flavor. It almost has an almondy undertone. It’s not a sweet coffee and it certainly lacks a ‘punch’ that I appreciate. But it wasn’t bad and I’d highly recommend it for people who want something gentle but flavorful to wake up with.
Another thing worth mentioning ‘while concluding’ this article is the (way of storing) coffee beans, the most appropriate and best way of storing coffee beans is to keep them in an air tight jar or seal your packet after using the required amount of coffee beans; these are probably the best way to store coffee beans, it’ll help you in storing coffee beans for a “longer period of time”.
I work right by Equal Exchange and like to go on walks mid morning to grab my coffee. Working in this area, there's a lot of options for coffee. I tried Equal Exchange because I wanted to be more ethical in my purchasing decisions despite paying more. I heard good things about Equal Exchange from my coworkers but I experienced really bad service which is really unusual in places like this (I think). The cashier was SO rude to me especially when I asked if they had any flavors to put in the coffee. It was a bummer because normally my walks at work to coffee shops are one of the best parts of my day! The coffee is really good here though, so I may come back in hopes to interact with more friendly employees.

Processing method also appears to play a significant role in qualifying for the Top 30. On this year’s list, for example, of the 20 coffees for which processing method is clearly identified, seven (vs. six in 2017) were dry- or “natural”-processed, meaning the beans were dried inside the fruit rather than after the fruit has been removed, as is the case with wet-processed or “washed” coffees. Until the last ten years or so, dry-processing was seldom applied to high-end specialty coffees like those that appear on our Top 30 list. This showing is evidence of the continuing trend toward use of alternative processing methods as creative tools for crafting distinctive cup profiles.


It was about time for a café au Parisienne on our list. Say hello to Bulletproof, a whole bean coffee that strives to find the absolute perfection as far as a cup of Joe can go. Every single bean that you will find in your own pack or this organic decaf coffee has been handpicked by a skilled person in the deep of Central America when it was ripe and ready to be enjoyed. Therefore, all you need to do is sit back and enjoy.
If you're a no-frills coffee drinker, this simple but flavorful Colombian Peaks pod from ubiquitous coffee brand Eight O'Clock Coffee is for you. It has a well-balanced flavor with a straightforward coffee taste that shines through. Reviewers claim that these pods quickly replaced their morning trip to the coffee house after one taste. These coffee pods are compatible with Keurig single-serve coffee machines.

Promising review for their Cold Brew Cold Press Elixir blend: "I have ordered a few bags of this and it's become my favorite coffee for cold brew. The grind is nice and coarse; it's been fresh every time I have open a bag, unlike a few more-expensive brands I've purchased on Amazon (that came fancifully packaged, but whose aroma fell short when the sealed bag was opened). The taste is complex and the caffeine level is potent. After a big serving of this, a hummingbird can't keep up with me." —Mr. BBQ guy

When I moved away from a grocery store that carried Equal Exchange three or four years ago, I remember checking, and you had to order it directly from Equal Exchange, and wait for standard shipping. I guess thanks to the Whole Foods merger, now you can get this right on Amazon. I was excited to discover this, but the mislabeling is a bummer! Amazon, please fix!

These K-cups worked great and made a good cup of coffee. I generally prefer a lighter roast. The flavor was very bold and for a dark roast was very good. There were no grounds or oils on the top of the coffee. It was best as the first cup of coffee in the morning as it was not decaffeinated. The cups functioned in the coffee maker well and removed most of the water in the cup after brewing so you don't drip coffee on the counter. Since this is Paul Newmans's brand I do fee like I am helping because they donate most of the profits to charity so I feel better when I use their products. Overall a good product for people that like a dark roast coffee.
As more and more coffee companies cave to the temptation to adulterate with soy beans sprayed with chemical flavors and questionable trade practices, Equal Exchange may be the last coffee company standing to offer organic whole beans sourced from small producer coops, and roasted at a worker owned facility stateside. The company maintains its commitment to fair trade and supports many worthy causes. I recently had cause to engage in a lengthy discussion with reps at Equal Exchange and consider their inteigrity (and really great tasting coffee!) unsurpassed.
A weekend morning, or at least part of one, spent in the lobby of the Dean Hotel, which is where you will find the very best coffee shop in the coolest big city in New England right now, is always time well spent. Look for these guys at the RISD Museum, too, where they've recently partnered with the school on the excellent Café Pearl. Easily one of the most memorable multi-roaster operations between New York and Boston.
“Organic certification,” says Aaron Jordan of Roast House Coffee, whose Ethiopia Suke Quto scored 92, “is the bedrock of Roast House’s green coffee purchasing values. Seven years ago when the company started, we made a commitment to exclusively purchasing organically grown coffees, and one of the ways we prove that commitment is through certifications. It’s very important to the core of our business values and ethics.” So, Roast House has essentially built its business on organic certification as a fundamental value, and has drawn customers who share that priority, rather than picking and choosing coffees to market to various customer sectors. However, the Suke Quto bag doesn’t include the USDA organic seal, simply because Jordan reserves bags with the seal for his year-round offerings. (The Suke Quto is a limited reserve).

I ordered the Equal Exchange Organic Ethiopian Coffee after receiving a notice (prior to my subscription shipment) that the price had gone up on the Coffee Masters Gourmet Coffee, Ethiopian Yirgacheffe, Whole Bean, 12-Ounce Bags (Pack of 4) , a coffee I discovered after a long search and many pounds of not very good coffee. The price on the equal exchange was about 15-20% lower; what i had been paying for the other when I subscribed, and had a lot of good reviews so I thought I would give it a try.


Back before the nation's capital had a whole lot going on in the way of local coffee, Chris Vigilante was roasting for local restaurants in the basement of a District row home. These days, his product is a firm D.C. favorite, even if home base is a somewhat sprawling roastery, café and social hub, just over the line in Prince George's County. The company's adopted home seems to be agreeing with them—a second, also rather impressive space has now opened doors near the University of Maryland campus in College Park.
Promising review for their Original Black blend: "You can always tell when a company cares deeply about the quality of their products, and RISE is one of those companies. When you pop their tops, these bad boys literally GROWL at you, which I've since learned is an indication of a proper nitrogen-infused beverage (not to mention being just plain cool). I poured mine over ice and watched as a beautiful froth formed on top (the 'cascade,' as they call it). It's delightful, and definitely my new after-lunch pick-me-up!." —Marc

Promising review for their Dark Roast blend: "I've always been wary of cults: the blind loyalty, bad punch, separation from family, etc. However, after going through about 40 pounds of Koffee Kult Dark Roast in the last year, I'm now a well-informed and dedicated drinker of exceptional koffee with my whole family. Yes, even my 9-year-old loves this stuff." —Ben V
Strength control is understood to be regulated by the ratio of coffee to water. For example, more ground coffee and less water would result in a stronger brew. But, how does that work with a single serve machine, when you cannot regulate the amount of coffee and yet you can regulate the strength and volume of water simultaneously? In other words, you can select an 8-ounce drink to be strong or weak, but without changing the amount of coffee.
Breville BES870XL – a high-quality espresso maker, 100% comparable to the fully-automatic machines! The barista-quality coffee takes less than one minute to make from bean to espresso. This machine is more for people who appreciate the great coffee, if you are looking for a simple machine that prepares a coffee with one push, look elsewhere, like the Nespresso machines.

“My husband is a coffee addict, and I’m a bit of a fanatic about chemical additives and such. When I saw organic coffee offered for review, I knew I had to get this for him. Here is his review on the coffee: ‘I typically like bolder, dark-roast coffees. Once in a while I’ll mix it up when I’m out, and I’ll order a medium-roast brand. As far as buying an entire bag for home, I’ve grown tired of most medium roasts and do not want to waste money on tinny flavored coffee. This medium roast, however, is at the top of the bracket. I had to look at the bag a second time to make sure it was actually a medium roast. Very impressive full flavor.’”

From small farmer co-ops in Latin America. A product of Equal Exchange. Certified organic by Oregon Tilth. Our Commitment: To pay a fair price to the farmer; To trade directly with democratic cooperatives; To offer pre-harvested credit to aid farmers throughout their growing season; To develop long-term trade partnerships; To support sustainable and shade grown farming practices. We are committed to these principles on 100% of our coffees, teas, cocoas & chocolate. Farmer as Equals: Equal Exchanges is much more to us than just a buyer of our coffee. We see you as a partner who treats farmers as equals. You share our commitment to growers and to the land, and are helping us create a better future. Our Quality: Equal Exchange, a worker-owned Fair Trade organization, has been offering gourmet sustainably grown coffees since 1986. Because of our close relationships with farmers, we get their best beans. We then roast our coffees in small batches to bring out their best characteristics. But our commitment to quality extends beyond the beans to include the quality of life of the farmers with whom we work. We hope you will enjoy this coffee brought to you pride by Equal Exchange and our small farmer partners in Latin America, Africa and Asia. Fair Trade at Work: Much of the world's coffee is grown by small farmers, purchased at negligible prices by middlemen, and then brought and sold on a commodities market thousands of miles away. Equal Exchange provides an alternative by working directly with small farmer cooperatives, helping to build pride, independence and community empowerment. With the added income and stability provided by this relationship, farmers can make improvements in their own lives. Women's leadership development in Guatemala, eco-tourism projects in Nicaragua, savings and loan projects in Mexico - these are some of the most vivid examples of the benefits of Fair Trade.
There is a bewildering array of choice when it comes modern ground coffee blends. You can opt for a selection of different roasts, grinds, and beans sourced from all over the world. One prime concern is sustainable and ethical production and sourcing of coffee. You should try to stick with brands that have FairTrade and Rainforest Alliance or similar certification or follow explicitly sustainable practices as much as possible. Brands are coming out with more potent and more innovative blends all the time. This is a great time be alive as a coffee lover!
A talented roaster first, but also on top of their café game (their in-house baker does some very good work), look for one of three beautiful shops scattered around South Dakota's largest city to sustain you through those long, Upper Great Plains winters. Fun fact—head roaster Andrew Fritz started out as a curious customer, slowly working his way up through the ranks at this relatively underrated operation.

Need further proof that great coffee can (and does) happen just about anywhere, nowadays? At least a couple of hours from the nearest big city and convenient mostly to nature—beautiful Blackwater Canyon, for example—this multi-roaster and unofficial community center anchors an array of independent businesses on an old coal town's handsome and very historic main drag.
Who would have guessed that one of the most impressive coffee roasters in the West would have come up in the land of hot drinks abstainers? No doubt the pioneering team behind this single estate-only operation were slightly surprised, too—at a time when Salt Lake had very little good coffee to speak of, they took the plunge; now it's hard to imagine Utah's impressive artisan scene without them.

If you are just looking for a smooth, non-acidic coffee you will probably like this. If you are anything of an aficionada, like African coffee, or Ethiopian in particular, are looking for those distinctive notes, the chocolate flavor for which Ethiopian coffees are known.... you will not find it here. I am glad, that at this juncture I am not in the same place I was when I got the poor roast from coffee bean direct. i do have a good option, know where to find a nice Ethiopian. I just have to accept paying more, or maybe get it less often :( But in my opinion the Coffee Masters Gourmet Coffee, Ethiopian Yirgacheffe, Whole Bean, 12-Ounce Bags (Pack of 4) is vastly better.


Eight O’Clock Coffee is a sleeper in this set, brand-wise, but a surprisingly enjoyable cuppa. It’s the only brand I tasted about which I had no preconceptions, and it turned out to be one of my favorites. It’s dark without being bitter, and is solidly microwaveable. It’s slightly ahead of the median bagged coffee price in this set but streets ahead in flavor, making it a solid value buy.


A popular, professional blend combining the best of Indonesian and African Robusta and Brazilian Arabica coffees, the Lavazza is simply extraordinary by any standard. It provides an intense aroma and a rich aftertaste with unique chocolaty notes. It is an ideal ground coffee for making espresso-based beverages, yet also appropriate for people who enjoy a standard cup of coffee.
The biggest draw of organic coffee is that it's grown and harvested without chemical assistance. There are no pesticides, herbicides, fungicides or insecticides used in the agricultural process. If fertilizer is needed to help the beans grow, farmers use natural things like compost and coffee pulp. This means that organic coffee shoppers are getting home-grown beans without nasty additives of any kind.
Promising review for their OneCups: "San Francisco Bay produces the most superior coffee on the market, and their varieties will satisfy a wide array of tastes. They are also environmentally conscientious, because their pods are 97% biodegradable (but that doesn't compromises the quality of the coffee, or the quality of the pod itself). Some reviewers have complained about beans pouring into their cup, or receiving damaged pods, but I've never had an issue like that and I've been drinking San Francisco Bay for about seven years. When I rate a product with five stars, it means I won't look anywhere else, if I need it again. I've tried dozens of different brands and different coffees over the years, and no one comes close to San Francisco Bay. Pick a flavor profile you like and you won't be let down." —Michael J. McKenzie

Our unknown brands overwhelmingly ranked high in all of the categories we tested. Our runner up for best overall coffee and unknown brands was Cameron’s whole bean light roast. Cameron’s offers drinkers another option in the sustainable and small batch category, but comes in as one of the most expensive options at $.71 per ounce. Tasters commented over and over that this was a smooth coffee and that taste wasn’t overpowering. The finish of the coffee ranked higher than any other we tested.
Stumptowns Mountain Coffee is of course, an organic blend but really shines through the pack with an offering of blended fruit and chocolate flavor notes. This brand is very serious about their coffee, it’s reported that they once held the record for paying the most for a batch of coffee beans and often pay their farmers three to four times the value for coffee beans. They truly appreciate the farms that produce for them, and that’s a huge part of what the organic initiatives are trying to accomplish, beyond just labeling a package of beans.
To further our research, we asked all of our coffee testers if they would spend an extra $1.00 on a product if it was proven that the company directly benefited the community or environment. Each tester said yes. In addition, when looking at overall ratings online, organically and sustainably-sourced coffee rated higher overall compared to your typical Arabica coffee.

It is much easier to use compared to rest of the drip coffee makers, we’ve reviewed. Can be programmed 24h before to automatically brew. The resulting coffee is much hotter compared to most of drip coffee makers and it does not get overheated or bitter because it is in the thermal carafe. If you are looking for a quest for the ideal cup of coffee and this hits the mark.
The main benefit of organically grown coffee is that, because it is not subjected to commercial fertilizer or insecticide, its beans would be free of chemical residue. For this reason, some people claim that Organic Coffee has a fuller, richer flavor than non-organically grown coffee. Aside from the taste of the coffee, growing coffee using Organic farming methods benefits the environment and the health of the consumer and the farmer. The production of Organic Coffee uses no chemical fertilizers to feed the plants and no chemical pesticides to keep insects at bay. Pesticides and other non-organic farming chemicals accumulate in human body fat, causing damage to the nervous and reproductive systems. While Organic Coffee may cost more, most would say the benefits outweigh the added cost.
I absolutely love this coffee, I've been buying all my coffee organic, and tried bunch of different brands, I wouldn't call my self a coffee expert, but I notice small differences between coffee beans, this 5lbs is a great, and I mean great and price wise, it makes sense to go with that option, one thing I would love to have is a sealed bag option to keep it from drying out, but it's a small caveat, I'd definitely buy this brand again if they don't go crazy and Jack up the $ through the ceiling.
It is a nice smooth mild and non-acidic coffee *BUT* it does not have the distinctive taste of Ethiopian, or any African coffee I have tried. I love African coffee. In fact, the only reason I am ordering coffee is that noone brings African coffees into Hawaii :( :( For many years I had Single Origin Coffees Tanzanian Gombe Reserve - Whole Bean 10 oz on subscription, but then they raised shipping to $30 making it impractical. I first tried Coffee Bean Direct Ethiopian Yirgacheffe, Whole Bean Coffee, 16-Ounce Bags (Pack of 3) which was either burned, or poor quality beans; tasted burned and left a bitter aftertaste. I had a similar experience with their Kenya reserve, and so with 10 pounds of bad coffee in my freezer tentatively tried a sampler Coffee Masters Around The World In Twelve Coffees Variety Pack, 1.5-Ounce Packets (Pack of 12) and was very impressed with the quality and roast, and so ordered several of their single origin whole bean. All of them were very nice and it has been my roaster of choice here (I have several of their ocffees on subscription) until the price hike.

Our suppliers import and roast only the finest Organic Arabica Coffee beans. After passing through stage after stage of careful discrimination, We ensure that our Organic Coffee beans come solely from the top percentage of the harvest. Our expert partners often travel to buy directly from handpicked Fair Trade estates. Our Organic Coffee beans are slow roasted in small batches, illuminating all the coffee's best qualities. For your enjoyment, our Organic Coffee is always roasted to order and delivered at absolute peak freshness.


Many roasters queried us to ask if they could submit coffees they felt confident were farmed without use of synthetic inputs because of their familiarity with the producers. Nevertheless, for this report, we concluded that we needed to stick to reviewing coffees that consumers could be assured were produced under organic conditions using organic protocols. We went so far as to check the organic documentation at the farm level provided by importers for all the coffees we review here.
If you want to try a variety of coffee that’s customized to your taste, you can’t go wrong with Craft Coffee. When you sign up, you’ll be asked how much coffee you drink at home, what type of coffee you drink and who your favorite roasters are. Based on these choices, you’ll be matched up three different roasters each month that will deliver their coffee to your door. Some roasters may be familiar to you, while others won’t. If you love to experiment and broaden your horizons, Craft Coffee is a great option.

Once a self-described stoner kid who did a stint with Intelligentsia in Los Angeles, Andrew Heppner came home to open what's quietly become one of the state's most compelling roasters, one that's only recently made the decisive move into the retail game, after an early (and failed) attempt at opening their own shop. That's in the past, now—not only have they made it work with a fine cafe in Bay City, Populace also joins the much-hyped collection of outlets now opening along with Detroit's hotly-anticipated Siren Hotel.
Finally, coffee production is being affected by global climate change. Coffee requires extremely stable temperature conditions in order to thrive. In its natural habitat, elevation and forest would provide additional temperature stability. But today, we are seeing that the “coffee belt” we relied upon for so long is changing, and the regions where coffee can be grown are also changing, with a huge effect on local farmers and economies that rely on coffee exports to survive.
I was pretty disappointed in this local coffee spot, unfortunately. I walked in and the staff seemed in disarray. I waited 15 minutes for a coffee, watching other people who ordered after me get their drinks filled. They had forgotten my order as it turned out, and when I asked about it, they were not too friendly in understanding what happened. After I finally pushed about needing to go, they finally made my drink, but I only had a couple minutes to finish it. Needless to say, I wasn't happy with their service at all. And my coffee was nothing impressive. Not worth the price in my opinion.
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