On the flip side, if you suffer from headaches, stomachaches or toothaches after drinking your morning cup of joe, you might want to switch to a low-acid coffee. It's much easier on your body, and it won't damage your teeth enamel or irritate your stomach lining. Just remember that the pH scale goes backwards, so lower pH levels mean higher amounts of acid. This means that a low-acid coffee would actually have a higher pH level than other brands.
Also try For the best Ohio morning ever, in any weather, stop at Heartwood Coffee Roastery in Cleveland-adjacent Hudson, then disappear onto the trails of the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, next door. As if you needed more proof that incredible coffee can happen anywhere, nowadays, Branch Street Coffee Roasters, in a strip mall outside of hardscrabble Youngstown, offers more. Down in Columbus, seek out the sleek, twin locations of Fox in the Snow, while in Cincinnati, Ferrari Bros. Barber & Coffee is a vintage family business, now being nudged (ever so sensitively) into the present day.
If you are just looking for a smooth, non-acidic coffee you will probably like this. If you are anything of an aficionada, like African coffee, or Ethiopian in particular, are looking for those distinctive notes, the chocolate flavor for which Ethiopian coffees are known.... you will not find it here. I am glad, that at this juncture I am not in the same place I was when I got the poor roast from coffee bean direct. i do have a good option, know where to find a nice Ethiopian. I just have to accept paying more, or maybe get it less often :( But in my opinion the Coffee Masters Gourmet Coffee, Ethiopian Yirgacheffe, Whole Bean, 12-Ounce Bags (Pack of 4) is vastly better.
It depicts the source of organic coffee to be from the place called Yemen and Indonesia. However, there is a blend of Arabica in this pack which many of the coffee fanatics cherish. In fact, there are some regular Mocha Java consumers who hardly seem to switch to another brand because of the sweet bitter taste. It is the energy rush of this coffee that will leave you mesmerizing about the roasting methods.

Nevertheless, pesticides and herbicides are widely used, sometimes abused, in the coffee fields of the world. Many consumers seek organically grown coffees out of concern for the health of the earth itself and those who live on it. According to a report from Technavio Research, the Compound Annual Growth Rated (CAGR) for organic coffee is expected to increase by 13% between now and 2021. This research attributes this projected growth, in part, to millennials, who, as a demographic, are said to be concerned with the environment and a healthy lifestyle, and to have a willingness to spend money for specialty or niche products like organic coffee. So it appears that, while the driving force behind the demand for organic coffee may be changing from health concerns to environmental concerns, the demand itself is on the rise. According to a World of Organic Agriculture 2016 report quoted by ecologist Julie Craves, coffee is the world’s largest single organic crop.

One of the biggest misconceptions about Colombian coffee is that it has to be Robusto coffee. Cameron’s Colombian Supremo is 100% arabica coffee, light roast and perfect for those who want to grind their own coffee at home without getting too much acidity or a shock to the system of coffee flavor. When you want an exceptional tasting coffee, look for small batch roasted coffee beans, the exact roast that Cameron’s is giving to you with this batch. You get balanced coffee flavor without overloading your palette, an average level of acidity, and a smooth, decadent finish. Perfect for any level of coffee drinker, new to the game or seasoned and looking to try every roast under the sun.


Also, to be purely selfish and not think about the planet for a moment, organic coffee often simply tastes better. Grown in their natural environment, the beans take longer to mature, and develop a deep, complex flavor without as much acidity. Of course, the finished taste of a cup of coffee has as much to do with the roasting and brewing as it does the origin of the beans, but organic coffees generally come out far ahead in taste tests.
Café Altura was established in 1980 in Ventura, California. The beans are sourced from the district of Villa Rica – Pasco, Peru. Aside from fresh ground coffee, said company is also known for their whole bean coffee, canned coffee, instant coffee and mountain water decaf. The Café Altura Ground Organic Coffee is sold in eight flavors namely: dark roast, dark roast decaf, fair trade dark blend, fair trade classic roast, house blend, French roast, regular roast and regular roast decaf. Café Altura brands their coffee as a biodynamic coffee. It is called biodynamic because the coffee farmers take into account the biodiversity surrounding the farm.
Over the course of the year, we reviewed fewer than a dozen darker roasts. Most were medium-dark at best; some barely that. The majority of darker roasts we reviewed were sent by roasters in Taiwan and most were espressos, reflecting both the time-honored espresso practice of emphasizing chocolate and sweetness through moderate dark roasting, as well as, perhaps, a preference in Taiwan for more traditional styles of espresso as opposed to the lighter-roasted, brighter style of espresso now popular with the leading edge of North American roasters.

In terms of flavor, arabica beans win the prize. They brew a more delicate cup of coffee with slight overtones of berry and a high level of acidity. Robustas have a lot more caffeine – nearly twice as much as arabica beans – but they also have a stronger, more bitter taste that can be a bit harsh. Still, there are high-quality robustas available, and these beans do make a good cup of espresso.
Nebraska's most impressive roaster at the moment occupies a deceptively simple (but also pleasingly modern) storefront on a block shared with a brewery, a wine bar and Omaha's most talked about ice cream shop—it's clearly a new day for the once-forlorn Blackstone District. There's a lot of this sort of positive change happening around Omaha lately, some of it down to young and talented entrepreneurs like Isaiah Sheese, who moved here to roast coffee, just a few years ago. Things appear to be working out okay—Archetype is now opening a second shop, in another up-and-coming area of town.
Many of us cannot envision a life without that morning cup of coffee. Legend has it that we owe a debt to frisky Ethiopian goats for the discovery of coffee! Whatever the truth in that story, there is no doubt that coffee first originated in that region of Africa. If you are a coffee fanatic, there has never been a better time for your tribe than right now! There are innumerable versions and blends of coffee available in the market, with considerable variations in taste, aroma and caffeine levels. 

A cruise can be the ultimate vacation destination, especially if you are someone who has a difficult time deciding what exactly you want to do while you are vacationing. Cruises are amazing because not only are you able to see different parts of the world, you're also able to have access to a wide array of activities including shows, amazing dinners, and even possibly gambling.
Nescafe is a huge multinational brand of coffee owned by Nestle. We commend Nescafe partnering with for the Rainforest Alliance, the Sustainable Agriculture Network (SAN), and the Common Code for the Coffee Community (4C) to be sure they are following internationally recognized sustainability standards but they do not offer organic certified coffees. Therefore, their coffee’s may contain chemicals and mold. They only offer instant coffees, ground coffee, or pods so again, freshness is a concern.

It has a great flavor, period! I'm a person of few words. Coffee is great. It has a great flavor, period! I'm a person of few words. Coffee is great. It has a great flavor, period! I'm a person of few words. Coffee is great. It has a great flavor, period! I'm a person of few words. Coffee is great. It has a great flavor, period! I'm a person of few words. Coffee is great. It has a great flavor, period! I'm a person of few words. Coffee is great. It has a great flavor, period! I'm a person of few words. Coffee is great.


I drink one cup of coffee to start my day, using a Keurig and refillable K-cup. This can sometimes be less than ideal because the coffee can taste off (usually too weak). I was worried the same would be true about this Breakfast Blend, since those can generally be on the weaker side, but was pleasantly surprised at how bold and flavorful this was. It smells great, too - just opening the bag in the morning helped wake me up!
Already no stranger to a good cup of coffee, Bellingham, a lively college town closer to Vancouver, BC than Seattle, reached top tier status with the addition of this very fine roaster, an extraordinary collective of expertise that has more than a few baristas and café owners around the country just a little bit excited. A very nearly elegant, all-day café—Camber's first foray on to the retail side—in downtown Bellingham is pilgrimage-worthy.

This famous roaster is trying to change the game of specialty coffee. Blue Bottle is all about customization and gives you full control over your coffee choices. As a part of their subscription, you can choose what coffee you want and how much of it you want. You can select a half bag, single bag, double bag or even a triple bag and have it delivered every week, two weeks, three weeks, or once a month. If you want full control over what you get and how often you get it, Blue Bottle is the way to go.


French press - French press coffee involves "pressing" your coffee grounds to the bottom of a container instead of filtering them the traditional way. While you can use any type of bean to make your grounds, there are certain roasts and coarseness levels that work best with a French press, so you'll want to do some research before you start experimenting.
Equal Exchange Organic Coffee prides itself on being Fair Trade, and for good reason. They do a lot of outreach and connection with their farmers to make sure they are well taken care of and everything is on the up and up. Currently, their breakfast blend coffee sits at 4.4 stars, along with an Amazon's Choice badge. So Amazon seems to approve of them, enough to recommend them outwardly. Let's see if we can find out what's so good. 
Don't forget to account for the amount of coffee in the pod. Get your kitchen scale out and weigh them. Barista Prima Italian Roast and Pete's Major Dickasons both boast impressive weights (about 18g). Generally speaking, the more coffee in the pod, the stronger the brew. If you look at the box, they will disclose the amount of coffee. The weight I mention is the total weight of coffee and the pod.
My daughter bought this coffee and gave it to me. She liked the idea that it was organic & free trade and so did I. This coffee is really good. I ran out so I bought a similar brand fair trade, Colombian and organic from a local store and could really tell the difference. The other coffee was bitter, no matter how I much I used, whereas with this coffee even when I make it stronger it is very smooth and tastes great the only problem I have is that I drink more of it than I should. I have ordered it again and set it up on Subscribe & Save, may as well save where I can.
What’s the deal with chicory, you ask? Chicory root has been cultivated in Europe as a coffee substitute for centuries, and was first brought to the U.S. by the French during the Civil War. Though it’s naturally bitter in its raw form, chicory root can be baked, roasted, ground, and then used as an additive to add a rich and caramelized flavor to coffee and even beer.
Four espressos appear on this year’s list, three of them single-origin coffees. The fourth is a distinguished blend of coffees from a mix of origins—the impressive 96-point Twenty Five by Barrington Coffee Roasters, at No. 6, the only blend on the list. Numerous blends, both espresso and non-espresso, earned 90-94 points but did not ultimately make our Top 30; we recognize some of the best on our list of the Top Coffees by Category.
Evaluated as espresso. Complex, juicy, richly tart. Almond, dark chocolate, guava, tangerine zest, star jasmine in aroma and small cup. Light, very silky mouthfeel; chocolate, fruit and flowers all carry into a cleanly sweet, delicately drying finish. Flavor-saturated in three parts milk: almond, chocolate, guava, flowers all resonate in rich, custardy balance.
Tucked into one of Maine's most idyllic coastal destinations, Melissa Raftery and Megan Wood's sophisticated, certified organic roasting operation has brought them acclaim far beyond Deer Isle—not a bad day's work for what was originally dreamed up as a straightforward coffee shop. Self-funding their way in, the woman-powered operation now includes two very good cafes, one seasonal, one year-round, both turning out some of the most memorable coffee in the state.

“My wife and I have tried most of the higher-end, mail-order, and micro-roasters and finally found our go-to coffee. Really a great cup of coffee. We have always liked to freshly grind and brew our coffee, and prefer to use a French press. This coffee is not burned, bitter, or acidic. Not really a dark, dark roast. More of a medium-dark roast. Perfect. Has a slightly nutty, chocolaty, and full-body taste. For overall quality, I would give it four-and-a-half stars — but with this price point, quality, and [the fact that it] is organic, this coffee is a no-brainer.”
Seattle got most of the attention, but the '90's were very good to the Windy City, coffee-wise—let's start with Intelligentsia, beginning life as a relatively modest café and roastery in the Lakeview section of town, back in 1995. Like Seattle today, Chicago's scene is wonderfully layered, offering up everything from the unabashedly traditional to the cutting-edge. For the best of the latter, look way, way west—steps from where the notorious Horner projects stood crumbling thirty years ago—to a block shared with another celebrated coffee roaster (Sparrow) and a very good brandy distillery (Rhine Hall). Metric, something of a power partnership between the owner of a popular local café and a talented Intelligentsia vet, roasts its prized beans on a restored 1961 Probat, keeping relatively limited hours in an on-site café and tasting room, where public cuppings are held every Friday morning.

The taste and quality of the coffee bean depends largely on the environment in which it grows. Coffee plants require ample rainfall in the early months as fruit blooms, and less so afterwards after the fruit begins to ripen. For this reason, rainforests prove to be the ideal location for coffee production. As the fruit of the coffee plant is hand-picked, the seeds need to be dismantled from the fruit. The first method of doing so is called wet processing. The seeds are fermented in water for two or three days to get rid off the excess flesh or pulp which may be sticking to the seed. The second method is dry processing, the fruit is picked from seeds and laid out in sun for two to three weeks, turned regularly. The latter is the cheaper and lower quality method of processing beans.
Most of the beans touted on this list are whole bean; you must grind them yourself or go to a coffee grinder. While inconvenient for some, the benefits of buying whole bean are plentiful. When you grind the beans daily it releases oils, keeps them fresh, and it allows you to chose the coarseness of the grind. A coarse grind will not capture as much flavor profile as a fine grind. The difference in the grind denotes an espresso from a Turkish coffee or latte for example.
All of the coffee from Equal Exchange is grown in Latin America. They have small local farms spread throughout Latin America including Guatemala, Peru, Mexico, and many more. It is very rare for coffee to have a single origin. But just because it comes from different areas does not mean it is bad. They process their beans through non-chemical means to eliminate any threat of mold ending up in your coffee. 
Belfast native Michael McCrory met Lauren Crabbe behind an espresso machine in San Diego, her hometown. A move up north for school brought the pair to the relatively quiet Outer Sunset section of the city, to the opening of this café, to considerable success (and acclaim) on the roasting front, and then another café, just up the road. All of this good fortune aside, the cafes maintain the feeling of a treasured neighborhood hangout—that is, on days when lines aren't out the door.

This might seem like an elaborate set-up, but we actually came about all this after struggling for a couple of years drinking coffee and getting sick from it. I finally discovered that I am sensitive to the acids in coffee. This put me on a lot of research on coffee, the acids in it, how it is made and the best ways to grind and brew it. Both my husband and I are fairly frugal but after reading that coffee is the worst sprayed crop in the world except for Christmas trees (ever notice how Christmas tree farms have nothing but dead ground around the trees.... yeah, exactly like that!), we made the decision to do this. Also, I now can enjoy and drink coffee every morning without any abdominal pain.
Promising review for their Original Black blend: "You can always tell when a company cares deeply about the quality of their products, and RISE is one of those companies. When you pop their tops, these bad boys literally GROWL at you, which I've since learned is an indication of a proper nitrogen-infused beverage (not to mention being just plain cool). I poured mine over ice and watched as a beautiful froth formed on top (the 'cascade,' as they call it). It's delightful, and definitely my new after-lunch pick-me-up!." —Marc

The not-so-big city at the heart of Pennsylvania Dutch Country, Lancaster already had Square One Roasters—apparently, there's room for yet another great. Founded by a Blue Bottle/Parlor vet with local roots, this roaster's sensitively-mod retail operation sits just off Penn Square, across a very charming alleyway from the city's historic market hall. Carefully sourced coffees are fascinating, sometimes quite unusual, service can be downright gracious—this is one of those places everyone ought to come to take notes, to see how it's done. 
Auto brew features are cool because they allow you to set the exact time you would like to have your brew ready. It is another option that we like, but would not consider seriously enough as a deciding factor. This is not a standard feature on low to mid-range coffee machines, which means that you need to be ready to drop $200 or more if you would like to have it.
As for authoritative seals, Equal Exchange Organic Coffee cuts no corners. Their coffee is USDA Organic certified. Also they are of course Fair Trade certified because that it literally what they have built their company on. They are the most Fair Trade coffee company that we have featured here.  Beyond that, they also have Arabica coffee beans, however there is no seal to cover that claim. But in their ingredients, they do have Arabica listed. Their website says that most of their coffee is shade grown. And just by looking at the company's practices it is hard to doubt that claim. Overall, it does not look like they have any claims that do not have something to back them up. 
One of the best things about this product is the fact that it went through the Techno Roasting process. The latter is an FDA-approved procedure, which has the benefit of eliminating the acid in the coffee that causes heartburn. This also preserves the qualities of the coffee, such as the vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. To add, it also removes the bitterness of the coffee while retaining its rich body and flavor. This means that you can enjoy unadulterated coffee with the purest flavor and aroma.
The idea of a K-Cup is definitely going to turn off a coffee snob. They like to have total control over the coffee—from the roasting to the grinding to the brewing to the preparing (God forbid you add milk!). They may consider using their own beans in a reusable K-Cup, but the fact that they can't control the brewing temperature and duration of the Keurig machine means they will look at the K-Cups the way they would a cup of convenience store coffee.
Cameron’s organic whole bean has greatly grown in popularity because of specialty coffee it gives that is rich in flavor. They only choose most flavorful Arabica beans from all over the world. They are then blended and roasted carefully in small batches before they are being rushed to consumers for them to enjoy the truly wonderful cup of the coffee. Some of the finest plantations where Cameron sought its coffee beans from include; Costa Rica, Kenya, Mexico, Sumatra, Jamaica, and Columbia. This coffee guarantees that it complied with meeting the strict environmental standards and most of their organic varieties are grown and processed without the use of herbicide, pesticides, or chemicals.
What discussion of organic (fair-trade, vegan, gluten free) coffee beans without Portland’s own Stumptown coffee making an appearance. Stumptown Holler Mountain Coffee is the signature organic blend that lends to their popularity since the roasters humble beginnings. This popular organic offering uses peak conditioned Latin American and East African coffees to maintain a balanced, elegant and consistent profile throughout the seasons.
Our trusty testers rated this coffee a 7.55 out of 10 on our overall testing scale. In the aroma category the coffee scored a 7.60 and received the most 10’s out of any coffee we tested. Those who like strong black coffee rated the aroma low with the thought it was going to be “fruity” or “weak,” but were pleasantly surprised with the taste. The coffee finish rated highly as well at 7.80 out of 10. Tasters specifically noted the caramel finish. Most guessed incorrectly that this was a Medium coffee roast.
“Organic certification,” says Aaron Jordan of Roast House Coffee, whose Ethiopia Suke Quto scored 92, “is the bedrock of Roast House’s green coffee purchasing values. Seven years ago when the company started, we made a commitment to exclusively purchasing organically grown coffees, and one of the ways we prove that commitment is through certifications. It’s very important to the core of our business values and ethics.” So, Roast House has essentially built its business on organic certification as a fundamental value, and has drawn customers who share that priority, rather than picking and choosing coffees to market to various customer sectors. However, the Suke Quto bag doesn’t include the USDA organic seal, simply because Jordan reserves bags with the seal for his year-round offerings. (The Suke Quto is a limited reserve).
Good morning. What can we get started for you?. . . . #baristadaily #coffeeshots #coffeeculture #coffeegeek #manmakecoffee #womanmakecoffee #peoplebrewcoffee #coffee #ilovecoffee #needcoffee #coffeegram #instacoffee #coffeeoftheday #vibes  #coffeesesh  #coffeeholic #lifestyle #coffeeaddict #mycupdiary #cafe #coffeeculture #morningslikethese #liveauthentic #coffeeshopcorners #fromwhereistand #flashesofdelight #drinkcoffeeliveforever #roastedinmichigan
We've featured a few wet-processed brands on this list, but tossing coffee beans into water tanks isn't the only way to treat them! With dry-processed beans, they're set out in the sun to bake until they're ready to be roasted. They can be slightly acidic since they don't go through a fermentation process, but a little kick just adds to the thrill of drinking something so raw and wild.
BREWINGCOFFEE BEANSRegion GuidesCoffee ReviewsGEAREspresso machinesCoffee MakersAccessoriesGrindersRECIPES Home →Beans →The 10 Best Coffee Beans of 2019 [Buyers Guide] 0 The Best Coffee Beans Of 2019ContentsWHERE To Buy The Best Coffee Beans...HOW to Choose The Best Coffee BeansArabica beans vs Robusta beansAcidity and BitternessSingle Origin vs BlendsRoast dateFair TradeUSDA organicTHE BEST COFFEE BEANS OF 2019 (WHOLE BEAN COFFEE)#1 - Kona Beans (Hawaii)Specifications#2 - Blue Mountain Coffee (Jamaica)Specifications#3 - Kenyan AA Coffee BeansSpecifications#4 - Peaberry Beans (Tanzania)Specifications#5 - Dark Sumatra Mandheling Beans from IndonesiaSpecifications#6 - Sulawesi Toraja Coffee BeansSpecifications#7 - Central American Geisha Coffee BeansSpecifications#8 - Monsooned Malabar beans from IndiaSpecifications#9 - Yirgacheffe Beans from EthiopiaSpecifications#10 - Death Wish Coffee BeansSpecificationsYou've Bought The Best Coffee Beans. Now What?Store them in a coffee canisterShould You Put Them In The Freezer?Enjoy Your Coffee!Amazing coffee starts with good coffee beans. There are literally thousands of options when choosing beans. Thousands. Make the wrong choice and you won't be brewing amazing coffee.Here's a list of the 9 best coffee beans in 2019 (This is a list of the best rated beans by true coffee lovers. You won't find brands like Lavazza or Starbucks here - sorry!)Whether you like a strong tasting espresso or refreshingly floral filter coffee, there is something for everyone on this list.Read on with us as we travel the globe and answer the question: What are the coffee beans for you?IMAGEPRODUCTFEATURESKona Beans (from Koa Coffee)Voted by Forbes “Best in America”Origin: HawaiiBest for Drip/Filter & French PressCHECK PRICE →Blue Mountain (Wallenford)100% Certified Blue Mountain CoffeeOrigin: JamaicaBest for: Drip/Filter CoffeeCHECK PRICE →Kenyan AA BeansHighest Grade African beansOrigin: KenyaBest for: Pour Over CoffeeCHECK PRICE →Tanzania PeaberryHighest quality Beans from the cropOrigin: TanzaniaBest for: Auto-drip or pour overCHECK PRICE →DARK Sumatra Mandheling BeansOrganic, Fair Trade, Rainforest Alliance CertifiedOrigin: Sumatra island, IndonesiaBest for: Espresso or French PressCHECK PRICE →Sulawesi Toraja BeansVery rare, sweet and complex (low acidity)Origin: Sulawesi island, IndonesiaBest for:French Press, Espresso, Pour overCHECK PRICE →Central American Geisha Coffee BeansRare, light and bright coffeeOrigin: Costa Rica and PanamaBest for: Auto-drip or pour overCHECK PRICE →Monsooned Malabar beans from IndiaSlow-roasted for fuller, more even flavorOrigin: India Best for: EspressoCHECK PRICE →Yirgacheffe Beans from EthiopiaExotic Flavor, pleasant acidity, earthy aromaOrigin: Ethiopia Best for: Auto-drip or pour overCHECK PRICE →Death Wish CoffeeWorld’s Strongest. Fair Trade and Organic CertifiedOrigin: Mixed (blend)Best for: Espresso, French Press, Moka PotCHECK PRICE →WHERE To Buy The Best Coffee Beans...The best coffee comes from people who care. Who cares about coffee as much as you do?The FIRST answer is local roasters. When you buy coffee directly from a local roaster you get the important benefit of fresh roasted coffee. Local coffee companies tend to be very passionate about the craft of roasting. Your first step in buying great coffee is to start exploring any roasters nearby and trying their coffee.If you don’t have access to a great local roaster: order from an online roaster. What’s important is that you choose a company who clearly says that they only roast coffee AFTER it’s ordered. You don’t want them roasting coffee 2 months in advance of shipping it.PRO TIP: If you order coffee Volcanica Coffee on Monday, they will roast and ship it on Tuesday.
The coffee is great and the staff is lovely. Would definitely recommend trying oat milk in any of their drinks - especially the iced latte. I'm bummed they no longer serve their spring roles because those were a great grab-and-go option. They do have an ample assortment of pastries, though! If you're there in the morning there's always a selection of cookies, scones, muffins etc.
Based out of Portland, this well-renowned roaster offers a slightly different take from others on the coffee subscription. Every two weeks you’ll get a rotating selection of coffee. And you can always order more of whatever type of coffee you enjoyed the most. This is a great way to stock up your coffee supply while trying new coffees you might not have even considered before. If you want to expand your coffee-tasting horizons, this could be the coffee subscription for you.
Update: I have discovered since my original comments, a simple way to completely remove the slight bitterness of this coffee. A nice local health food store owner, told me to add a "pinch" of Bob's Red Mill Baking Soda to my cup of coffee. Wow, it made Equal Exchange Breakfast Blend Coffee taste as good as the finest organic coffee I have ever tasted! With that said, I will continue purchasing this great organic coffee.

As more and more coffee companies cave to the temptation to adulterate with soy beans sprayed with chemical flavors and questionable trade practices, Equal Exchange may be the last coffee company standing to offer organic whole beans sourced from small producer coops, and roasted at a worker owned facility stateside. The company maintains its commitment to fair trade and supports many worthy causes. I recently had cause to engage in a lengthy discussion with reps at Equal Exchange and consider their inteigrity (and really great tasting coffee!) unsurpassed.


Tiny Footprint was founded in 2010. It’s the first Carbon Negative coffee company and they have some pretty sweet math to show they don’t make any unsavory impact on the Earth. One pound of coffee equals a nice donation from Tiny Footprint to support the Mindo Cloudforest region in Ecuador. They’re contribution to preventing deforestation outweighs their carbon footprint from coffee production.
Although the largest volume of organically grown coffee is produced in Latin America, particularly in Peru and Mexico, Africa also produces significant volumes. We have tested and enjoyed many engaging and distinctive organically grown coffees from Africa over the past couple of years, hence the subject of this report. Our hope was that we would source a range of organically certified coffees from several producing countries on the African continent.
I was craving Rooibos tea but still wanted a kick, so the barista suggested I mix two up and didn't charge me extra for it.  She was super friendly and had a giant smile on her face the whole time - truly delightful. I like that their ingredients are sustainably sources and that all they do is geared to a good cause as a whole. I'll be sure to stop by again soon!
Yo, products made specifically for mothers are the type of products I get the most hype about. Mommee Coffee was dreamed up during their founder's second pregnancy, because she was tired of having to settle for tasteless decaf and equally tired of feeling guilty when she drank full-caf brews. They design their blends to be safe-to-consume during every stage of motherhood, so they're low acid, chemical-free, fair trade blends that are as caffeinated (or non-caffeinated) as a mom requires: decaf, quarter caf, half caf, and full caf.

All these processes take more time and care, and therefore more labor, and therefore increase the price of the coffee. But these coffees also simply taste better, and provide a more satisfying experience. The fact that these methods tend to be organic and socially responsible is a byproduct of the care and attention to quality that these specialty coffees require.
This coffee, as I have stated above is delicious. The problem is, that out of the 18 cups, only two didnt fail. The Keurig would start to brew and be about half done, then the foil top of the cup would simply detach from cup in a spot, and the grounds would come spilling out. Almost as if whatever adhesive was used melted. Never had a problem with other cups. So, perhaps this was simply this batch of the product, but a co-worker had expressed a similar issue with Newman's Own cups months prior, but I had just figured that THAT was a bad batch of cups....
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