To find the best grocery store coffee, we tasted 11 brands commonly found at grocery stores around the country or online. I first conducted this test in July of 2017, but re-tested recently, incorporating a few new coffees that we hadn't tasted in the first round—for example, the coffee from Thrive, which is an online-only grocery store. Epicurious staffers rated the coffees and provided tasting notes. (I myself can be a little forgiving when it comes to bad coffee, so we needed outside opinions.) For every brand, we ordered a medium roast, which was usually "Breakfast Blend" or something equivalent.
The Hunt Brothers Coffee Beans | Blue Honduras Specialty Coffee | Certified Organic comes from Marcala, a region in Central America that is recognized with a DOP (Protected Origin Denomination). These 100% Arabica beans are grown on a fertile volcanic soil, which is enriched by volcanic lava. The growth process of the coffee is marked by the SHG – strictly high growth. This means that the fruits will mature slowly to make sure they create a full-bodied and deeper flavor as well as a premium taste.
Cost per Pound: From High (Very) to Reasonable. One can’t directly compare the price of Top 30 coffees from year to year because the mix of coffees varies too dramatically. In 2018, for example, two coffees on the list were priced as part of a bundle, and, for the first time in 2018, we recognized two bottled cold brew coffees, which are not priced in the same way as coffee beans.
They have the premier design, but do they hold up to the standard? Judge this coffee by its wrapper, and you won’t be disappointed. You’ll be blown away. This medium roast is roasted in Canada, certified Fairtrade, organic, Kosher, and straight out of Central and South Africa. These beans go through a rigorous process before getting into the package, and getting to you doorstep. Only a true blue coffee company who understands their customers go to such lengths, and that’s exactly what Kicking Horse Coffee does for you. Don’t compromise on one feature for another—organic coffee beans, roasted to perfection, and they’re waiting for you.
A rich and quality combination of spicy, sweet, and berry notes, the Caribou Coffee Blend is an expertly balanced product for your harmoniously relaxing and tasty cup. Caribou Coffee ensures that you get a premium-grade coffee cup, roasting just the world’s top 1% of select coffee beans in small amounts. The product is 100% Rainforest Alliance Certified and responsibly chosen for a healthier and more vibrant you.
Kicking Horse Coffee is the #1 best-selling whole bean coffee in Canada, known for their passion for the highest quality beans. Not only are they the best-selling organic, fair trade coffee in Canada, but they are also consistently rated as one of the best workplaces, with exceptional values and 20 years of doing the right thing for their customers and for the planet.
You won’t find local Robusta coffee in the United States. This coffee variety is exclusively grown in the Eastern Hemisphere, primarily in Africa. While some countries are able to grow both arabica and Robusta coffee, the climate needed is very specific and curated for Robusta coffee. If you like strong, rich coffee with nothing but coffee flavor and caffeine for days, you’re looking for Robusta.
As coffee consumption increased, and the value of coffee beans as an agricultural export grew, many farmers moved coffee off of hard-to-reach forested hillsides and grew it at lower elevations, in dedicated coffee fields, for ease of cultivation and harvesting. This transition from coffee as a plant grown in forested mountains to a plant grown on plantations has had an array of far-reaching effects.

We've featured a few wet-processed brands on this list, but tossing coffee beans into water tanks isn't the only way to treat them! With dry-processed beans, they're set out in the sun to bake until they're ready to be roasted. They can be slightly acidic since they don't go through a fermentation process, but a little kick just adds to the thrill of drinking something so raw and wild.
This is made by the same manufacturer as the coffee that has been mentioned above. However, this is not decaf. It is a dark French roast, which uses premium beans from South and Central America. It has an intense and smoky flavor, which may not be appreciated by all. This is for those people who like their coffee to have a strong character. It is made only with the ripest red cherries that have been roasted by experts to extract the maximum flavor in every cup.
Coffee snobs are the sort of people who know the difference between an Arabica and Robusta, have attended their fair share of "cuppings", and shun Starbucks as a place that sells "commercial swill". They prefer to brew their own coffee, which they've usually roasted themselves after importing free-trade beans from a country like Guatemala or Indonesia.
From small farmer co-ops in Latin America. A product of Equal Exchange. Certified organic by Oregon Tilth. Our Commitment: To pay a fair price to the farmer; To trade directly with democratic cooperatives; To offer pre-harvested credit to aid farmers throughout their growing season; To develop long-term trade partnerships; To support sustainable and shade grown farming practices. We are committed to these principles on 100% of our coffees, teas, cocoas & chocolate. Farmer as Equals: Equal Exchanges is much more to us than just a buyer of our coffee. We see you as a partner who treats farmers as equals. You share our commitment to growers and to the land, and are helping us create a better future. Our Quality: Equal Exchange, a worker-owned Fair Trade organization, has been offering gourmet sustainably grown coffees since 1986. Because of our close relationships with farmers, we get their best beans. We then roast our coffees in small batches to bring out their best characteristics. But our commitment to quality extends beyond the beans to include the quality of life of the farmers with whom we work. We hope you will enjoy this coffee brought to you pride by Equal Exchange and our small farmer partners in Latin America, Africa and Asia. Fair Trade at Work: Much of the world's coffee is grown by small farmers, purchased at negligible prices by middlemen, and then brought and sold on a commodities market thousands of miles away. Equal Exchange provides an alternative by working directly with small farmer cooperatives, helping to build pride, independence and community empowerment. With the added income and stability provided by this relationship, farmers can make improvements in their own lives. Women's leadership development in Guatemala, eco-tourism projects in Nicaragua, savings and loan projects in Mexico - these are some of the most vivid examples of the benefits of Fair Trade.
The successful, too-elusive combining of expertise and service is what sets this roaster apart from Nashville's impressive pack. A knack for experimentation doesn't hurt, either; these fellows were early adopters, for example, of the flash-chilling method for cold brew. One thing they've opted out of is over-retailing; right now, you'll find just the one café, over in downtown-adjacent Germantown. It's a good one, though, functioning almost as an all-day hang, with proper food and an evening happy hour. (Often, this sort of thing doesn't work. Here, it does.)
In terms of flavor, arabica beans win the prize. They brew a more delicate cup of coffee with slight overtones of berry and a high level of acidity. Robustas have a lot more caffeine – nearly twice as much as arabica beans – but they also have a stronger, more bitter taste that can be a bit harsh. Still, there are high-quality robustas available, and these beans do make a good cup of espresso.
Already no stranger to a good cup of coffee, Bellingham, a lively college town closer to Vancouver, BC than Seattle, reached top tier status with the addition of this very fine roaster, an extraordinary collective of expertise that has more than a few baristas and café owners around the country just a little bit excited. A very nearly elegant, all-day café—Camber's first foray on to the retail side—in downtown Bellingham is pilgrimage-worthy.
Based out of Portland, this well-renowned roaster offers a slightly different take from others on the coffee subscription. Every two weeks you’ll get a rotating selection of coffee. And you can always order more of whatever type of coffee you enjoyed the most. This is a great way to stock up your coffee supply while trying new coffees you might not have even considered before. If you want to expand your coffee-tasting horizons, this could be the coffee subscription for you.
The same holds true for Kickapoo Coffee, whose Ethiopia Kirite also scored 93. Caleb Nicholas says, “About 97 percent of the coffee we roast is certified organic, and we would not have purchased the Kirite if it were conventional. The USDA seal is optional, and we designed the bags to accommodate both organic and non-organic. If we put the seal on it, it would be just another sticker. Instead, we just label the coffee as organic and list our certifier, MOSA.”
This bean is so versatile that it makes the perfect first cup in the morning, the last cup before bed, and every cup in between. Everyone that enjoys a great cup of coffee will love the Camano Island Coffee Roasters, Organic Papua New Guinea Medium Roast Whole Bean coffee. This incredible organic coffee has been growing in the Papua New Guinea Highlands since it was first planted in 1930.

A coffee crop also requires a great deal of water, particularly when it is being grown quickly. It takes 37 gallons of water to produce enough beans for just one cup of coffee. Coffee is often produced in countries with a shortage of water, such as Ethiopia, and the combination of high water consumption and high fertilizer and pesticide use can lead to water degradation and pollution in water runoff.


Shifting, original, startling in its giddy intricacy. Winey pine (think retsina wine), cocoa powder, green apple, Concord grape, ginger blossom, much more in aroma and cup. Sweetly and delicately pungent in structure. Lightly syrupy and almost effervescently buoyant in mouthfeel. The winey pine character and a floral sweetness carry persuasively into a crisp finish.

The Organic Coffee Co., Chocolate Almond Whole Bean provides you a delicate balance between toasted almond, chocolate, and coffee flavors. If there is something that makes their coffee different is the fact that they know where to buy coffee beans – Panama. And they just go directly to the source and always making sure that they have grown without any chemical herbicides, pesticides, and fertilizers.
They have the premier design, but do they hold up to the standard? Judge this coffee by its wrapper, and you won’t be disappointed. You’ll be blown away. This medium roast is roasted in Canada, certified Fairtrade, organic, Kosher, and straight out of Central and South Africa. These beans go through a rigorous process before getting into the package, and getting to you doorstep. Only a true blue coffee company who understands their customers go to such lengths, and that’s exactly what Kicking Horse Coffee does for you. Don’t compromise on one feature for another—organic coffee beans, roasted to perfection, and they’re waiting for you.
Like the others, this coffee is certified both Organic and Fair Trade. But it was the only one among the 52 varieties that is also Rainforest Alliance Certified (RAC). This set them apart and gave them extra points in our Eco-Friendliness category. RAC is a credible certifying body that aims to protect our rain forests, soil, and other ecosystems from the devastation caused by coffee production.
Described by taste-testers as "nutty, earthy, smooth, and bold," these Sumatra Dark Roast pods from Starbucks are so bold in flavor that some reviewers claim they can actually be brewed twice to cut back on waste. Herbal and earthy, this single-origin coffee blend is not to be missed. These coffee pods are compatible with Keurig single-serve coffee machines.
Strength control is understood to be regulated by the ratio of coffee to water. For example, more ground coffee and less water would result in a stronger brew. But, how does that work with a single serve machine, when you cannot regulate the amount of coffee and yet you can regulate the strength and volume of water simultaneously? In other words, you can select an 8-ounce drink to be strong or weak, but without changing the amount of coffee.
One of the biggest misconceptions about Colombian coffee is that it has to be Robusto coffee. Cameron’s Colombian Supremo is 100% arabica coffee, light roast and perfect for those who want to grind their own coffee at home without getting too much acidity or a shock to the system of coffee flavor. When you want an exceptional tasting coffee, look for small batch roasted coffee beans, the exact roast that Cameron’s is giving to you with this batch. You get balanced coffee flavor without overloading your palette, an average level of acidity, and a smooth, decadent finish. Perfect for any level of coffee drinker, new to the game or seasoned and looking to try every roast under the sun.
Also try Texas overfloweth with worthy coffee roasters and shops right now, from Amarillo, way up in the Panhandle (Palace, Evocation) to Longview (Silver Grizzly Espresso) to San Antonio (Local) to McAllen (Reserva) way the heck down in the Rio Grande Valley, and you will typically find them taking the craft as seriously as you might expect in a state that perfected the art of, say, barbecue, or the breakfast taco. (Road trip, anyone?)
The most exciting thing here is the fact that the beans are air roasted. Not many coffee brands do this because the process is complicated and takes quite a while. As a matter of fact, less than 1% of all coffee is roasted this way. However, for Kona, it provided unique taste as well as ease of use in different type of coffee makers, French press coffee makers, and cold brew machines.
This is loosely on the quality of storing your beans: if you’re a coffee connoisseur, and you’re grinding away every day, be sure to leave your grinders clean. Coffee oil will gather and taint any new beans that enter the grinder—no matter how fresh, no matter how exquisite—and essentially ruin your experience. When preparing your beans, be sure to keep your machines clean.
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